click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production, but we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil, and perhaps equally important, even if we were able to produce more energy at home, we cannot isolate ourselves from energy shocks in the global economy. we have to cooperate with other nations in improving the global system of manufacturing and moving energy supplies. currently, a key to this is helping to assure the completion o
currency and commodity trading they're going to end early. in japan, indonesia, the philippines, they were all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the
for war or peace in this will. t while visiting indonesia,, i thailand, and the philippines ir octoberem i was reminded of thet economic vitality of southeast h asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising. [indiscernible] represent now the fourth larges. export market of the united states. these countries are center stag. to the circumstances with chinaa we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for a free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic fac growth t.lobal more broadly, we face the, specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. made we have made gains in domestic energy production. dep we remain highly vulnerable still our dependency on oil and equally important, even if we are able to produce more energy and home, we cannot isolate to e ourselves from energy drivenave shocks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations ing improving the global system of manufacturing and mov
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
three years. you look at relations with vietnam, with the philippines, with australia to a certain degree, with japan in a rapid way in a slightly different fashion. so the u.s. has been lucky enough, in fact, to have been invited back. i can remember living in asia in the '90s during the time when prime minister mahathir was writing books about asian values and the like. and that was very prevalent in asia and singapore. and that really has all drifted into the background these days. you know, the region wants america back there. you know, how you -- in what form and how you balance it and the diplomacy that goes with that is obviously very delicate. but i don't think it's the u.s. rushing back in to confront china so much as a diplomatic opening opening up for washington in the region. >> to the extent - >> how does -- well, go ahead. >> there really are two key features here to asian politics. every country in asia wants a better relationship with china. and they seek it in all aspects of their diplomacy. but it is also the fact that now, as richard indicates, really every count
such as singapore and the philippines. and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reallocating the naval fleet to achieve in these next few years a 60/40 split between the pacific and the atlantic oceans. hopefully, we will do that by 2020. increasing army and marine presence in the region after iraq and afghanistan, locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific including new deployments of f-22s and the mv-22 ospreys to japan. and laying the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter in 2017. the third element of our strategy that as we do force projection in the asia pacific and in the middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployments as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so that they can help provide for their own security. in latin america, in africa, in the
indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production but we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil. and perhaps equally important, even if we are able to produce more energy at home, we cannot isolate ourselves from energy-driven shocks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations in improving the global system of manufacturing and moving energy supplies. currently, a key to this is helping to ensure the
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7